Rupert Murdoch is Tech Savvy

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In a speech delivered today in London, media mogul Rupert Murdoch publicly warned newspaper publishers of the drastic changes on the horizon:

A new generation of media consumers has risen demanding content delivered when they want it, how they want it, and very much as they want it. Societies or companies that expect a glorious past to shield them from the forces of change driven by advancing technology will fail and fall.

Indeed, the glorious transformation of power to the consumer is well under way. It is perhaps more significant however, that this statement is coming from one of the most influential, powerful and important players in the media world. Moreover, Rupert Murdoch is a 75 year old man!

Also keep in mind, Murdoch’s media conglomerate News Corp. recently purchased MySpace.com. Some analysts estimate that this will grant access to 10-15% of all Internet ad space. Clearly he is a tech savvy 75 year old.

We have made awareness and education an ongoing theme and goal at www.marketing.fm and I consider Rupert Murdoch’s announcement to be a major feat. In recent posts we have followed what steps agencies and marketers have taken as a reaction to the shift in power as a result of new technologies. It is fascinating to watch this battle unfold. Mr. Murdoch’s speech is a check on our scorecard (right next to the pope getting an iPod).

Hopefully this blog and other headlines will help spread the word to the seemingly naive advertising and media executives. One doesn’t need to be a blog reader to see the changes taking place. The NewYork Times has been reporting on the shifting marketing/advertising landscape for months. The cover of Ad Age today predicted the demise of Account Management based on the out of date, 30 year old agency business structure and it’s failure to adapt.

Surely the ad execs read the trades?

[tags] myspace, advertising, agency, advertising agency, rupert murdoch, news corp., news corporation, end of advertising, ad execs, marketing.fm, future, marketing, new york times, nytimes, fox [/tags]

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