It’s the questions not the answers

Slack recently had an outage, which happens to every company, and people noticed on Twitter – wow what a reaction!

I was reminded a lesson I learned from Brad Burnham while I was at Union Square Ventures; it’s the questions and conversations that are important, not the answers. 

This came about from Brad as my colleague Andrew Parker and I were arguing over whether or not we should be checking in to a place on Foursquare.  We had gotten takeout/delivery (I can’t remember which). Following the “rules” you should check into places that you go (hey, this was before Swarm ok?). However we definitely purchased something from the restaurant, so didn’t that warrant letting them know? There were clear benefits; sharing on Twitter/Facebook, letting the business know, training the Foursquare system. There were also plenty of challenges; the location services may count this check in as “cheating” given we were so far away, we weren’t technically “there” if someone came looking (this happened a lot in the early days).

The list for both sides goes on. I think this is where Brad jumped in and stated that it didn’t really matter who was right or wrong – he was much more interested that the discussion was taking place. He said that many times it’s not about having clear rules for digital games, but rather the constructs make people think, and question – the discussion is the most important.

This brings me back to Slack; watching the reaction of people was fascinating. It didn’t matter if it was an outage, a hack, an AWS problem (I don’t even know if they are on Amazon) but rather that people noticed. Being in the zeitgeist vs having hype are two totally different things. This downtime brought companies to their knees, and people couldn’t work without it. That’s the most important thing to notice. I am sure we will get an explanation and post mortem, but people will still be using Slack. It reminds me also of the Twitter outages of the early days – only now there is a place to complain! (On Twitter – how meta)

As I look at companies both through my operator and investor lens, this discussion is the strongest signal to Slack dominance and usage across organizations and companies.   

Many see the valuation and argue, I see the discussion and see value.